Fahre Prinz und Du bist König

NSU Prinz 4 - 1961

The NSU Prinz is an automobile produced in West

Germany by the NSU Motorenwerke AG. The car was built

from 1957 to 1973, and received a model change in 1961

(the old model was continued until 1962).

One

of

the

revelations

of

the

Frankfurt

Motor

Show

in

September

1961,

the

Prinz

4

replaced

the

original

Prinz.

Its

new

body

closely

resembled

the

then

fashionable

Chevrolet

Corvair,

but

was

of

course

much

smaller.

Like

the

original

Prinz,

it

was

powered

by

a

two-cylinder

air-cooled

engine

in

the

rear.

The

Prinz

4

was

much

improved

and

continued

to

be

a

well-engineered

car,

like

its

predecessors.

The

engine

carried

on

the

tradition

of

eccentric

rod

driven

camshaft

inherited

from

NSU

motorcycle

engines

and

interestingly

had

a

dynastart

(combined

starter/generator)

built

into

the

crankcase.

Later

four-cylinder

engines

adopted

the

more

conventional

(pre-

engaged) separate starter motor and alternator.

In

1968,

Britain's

Autocar

road

tested

a

Super

Prinz.

They

had

tested

a

Prinz

4

in

1962,

and

in

commenting

on

how

little

the

car

had

changed

in

the

intervening

six

years

quipped

some

of

their

road

testers

appeared

to

have

gained

more

weight

than

the

commendably

light-weight

Prinz

in

that

period.

The

test

car

achieved

a

top

speed

of

113

km/h

(70

mph)

and

accelerated

to

97

km/h

(60

mph)

in

35.7

seconds.

The

home

grown

Mini

850

reached

97

km/h

(60

mph)

in

29.5

seconds

in

an

equivalent

recent

test

and

also

managed

to

beat

the

NSU's

top

speed,

albeit

only

by

about

3%.

At

this

time,

the

UK

car

market

was

heavily

protected

by

tariffs,

and

the

Prinz's

UK

manufacturer's

recommended

retail

price

was

£597,

which

was

more

than

the

(possibly

below

cost)

£561

asked

for

the

850

cc

Mini,

but

certainly

not

completely

out

of

touch

with

it.

The

testers

concluded

their

report

that

the

car

was

competitively

priced

in

its

class

and

performed

adequately.

They

opined,

cautiously,

it

offered

'no

more

than

the

rest'

but

neither

did

it

'lack

anything important'.

1961

Engine 598 cc Top speed 113 km/h Lenght/width 3,4 m/1,49 m
Photos mainly by Matti Kreivilä. Historical facts and technical details of the vehicles provided by Wikipedia. Movies YouTube.